Emergency Preparedness

In an emergency call 911.

Prepare your family, home and business to be disaster ready.

Kitimat is not immune to natural or human caused disasters so make sure you are prepared.

  • Having a household plan will help with the stress in an emergency.
  • Build an emergency kit that contains enough food, water and supplies to last at least three days. Waiting for a disaster to happen before building a kit is not the right approach. 
  • Know your neighbours. Immediate help following a disaster will most likely come from those nearest you - your neighbours.  You're in it together.

Hazards, Risks and Vulnerabilities

The HRVA (Hazard, Risk and Vulnerability Analysis) report is the foundation document for any community emergency program and is used to strategically plan for and recover from a natural or human caused disaster.  Identifying and understanding the hazards, risks and vulnerabilities Kitimat may face allows emergency managers to prepare, possibly prevent, or significantly reduce the impacts and consequences of a known potential hazard.

The purpose of an HRVA is to help community leaders make risk-based choices to address vulnerabilities through mitigation, response and recovery efforts.  A completed HRVA provides a comparison of any risks that may exist within the District of Kitimat or surrounding area.

Kitimat has identified "risks" that focus on the following characteristics:

  • little or no opportunity to warn residents of an impending incident
  • high risk of community isolation
  • need for prolonged, partial or full community evacuations

Hazards with the highest likelihood and greatest consequences are:

  • communications interruptions
  • explosion
  • interface fire
  • power interruptions
  • transportation interruptions

Hazards that would result in complex response and recovery include:

  • disease
  • extreme cold and snow
  • extreme heat
  • hazardous spill (land)
  • interface fire
  • landslide
  • earthquake
  • explosion

Interruptions to Kitimat’s critical infrastructure systems are also identified and create a complex response and recovery effort. It was recognized that the interruptions to either power, communications, water or transportation are hazards themselves and carry major impacts.

Each of these four key infrastructure sectors impact one another, other infrastructure and resident’s ability to function, respond and recover significantly. Particular emphasis is on an interruption to, or loss of, a government or healthcare facility (i.e. fire hall, public works building, city hall, or the hospital) which would significantly impede response efforts and affect the community's ability to recover. This could be the result of a secondary impact due to an interruption of the key infrastructure sectors, or a direct impact from a hazard such as an earthquake or interface fire.

A detailed analysis has been developed for each of the identified hazards which includes a summary of the impacts, risks and dependencies to critical infrastructure and environmental, social and economic factors.

Personal Support Network

Take the time to create a trusted support network of at least three people to assist during an emergency.  Give them keys and add their contact information to a shared emergency plan.  The support network should also be advised of any health conditions or medications and shown how to operate specialized medical or mobility equipment, such as lifts, wheelchairs or scooters.

Guide and Service Animals

Some people rely on animals for assistance; that means preparing for them as well.  Learn more about pet preparedness and create a separate emergency kit with the following items:

  • Three day supply of bottled water and pet food
  • Leash and collar, kennel or carrier
  • Necessary medications with contact information for the prescribing vet
  • Copies of vaccination records
  • A recent photo in case you are separated from your service animal

More information is available here for people with a disability.

Get a Kit

Take the time to create a trusted support network of at least three people to assist during an emergency.  Give them keys and add their contact information to a shared emergency plan.  The support network should also be advised of any health conditions or medications and shown how to operate specialized medical or mobility equipment, such as lifts, wheelchairs or scooters.

Guide and Service Animals

Some people rely on animals for assistance; that means preparing for them as well.  Learn more about pet preparedness and create a separate emergency kit with the following items:

  • Three day supply of bottled water and pet food
  • Leash and collar, kennel or carrier
  • Necessary medications with contact information for the prescribing vet
  • Copies of vaccination records
  • A recent photo in case you are separated from your service animal

More information is available here for people with a disability.

Other Considerations

Secure bookcases, TVs and heavy furniture in case of an earthquake.  This will prevent injury and ensure evacuation routes from a house or apartment are kept clear.

Ensure mobility devices will always be parked in easily accessible places for quick evacuations.

More information is available here for seniors.

Small Business Preparedness

If you are a small business owner you have likely invested a significant amount of time, energy and money in your operation. Depending on its size, you may have employees that rely on it for income and stability.

As small businesses are integral to the District of Kitimat goods and services chain, it is vital that every business is prepared to be up and running as soon as possible following any type of emergency or business disruption.

Learn how to improve your businesses resiliency during and after a disaster:

Neighbourhood Preparedness

During and after a disaster the most immmediate help will come from those nearest you - your neighbours. Plan with your neighbours beforehand so you both understand what you can do for each other when it counts the most.

Apartment and Condo Preparedness

When you live in a multi-family housing complex, preparedness is a joint task.  Talk to your landlord, building manager or strata corporation and encourage them to read through the Guide for Apartments, Condos and Townhomes to create a complex-wide plan.

Preparedness for People with Disabilities

Having a disability means you likely need to consider preparedness actions above and beyond the “basics”. Read up on what you need to do to be ready. Here are some things to keep in mind:

  • My ability to communicate may be restricted

  • My surroundings may change and look unfamiliar

  • My service animal or guide dog may be hurt or frightened

  • My health may be impacted by stress or confusion

Disasters can be overwhelming and stress may make some conditions worse for people. You may even have to ask for assistance in circumstances you usually do not. Be sure to talk to someone about how you are feeling and reach out for help if needed.

 Personal Support Network

Take the time to create a trusted support network of at least three people to assist you in an emergency. Give them keys and add their contact information to your shared emergency plan. Your support network should also know of any health conditions or medications and know how to operate specialized medical or mobility equipment such as lifts, wheelchairs or scooters.

Guide and Service Animals

Some people rely on animals for assistance. That means preparing for them as well. Learn more about pet preparedness and create a separate emergency kit with the following items:

  • three-day supply of bottled water and pet food
  • leash and collar, kennel or carrier
  • necessary medications with contact information for the prescribing vet
  • copies of vaccination records
  • a recent photo in case you are separated from your service animal

Preparedness for Seniors

Seniors in BC may want to consider preparedness actions above and beyond the “basics”.

Personal Support Network

Most importantly, take the time to create a trusted support network of at least three people to assist during an emergency. Give them keys and add their contact information to a shared emergency plan. The support network should also be advised of any health conditions or medications and shown how to operate specialized medical or mobility equipment, such as lifts, wheelchairs or scooters.

Get a Kit

An emergency kit should include a minimum three-day supply of food, water and basic necessities. Make it as portable as possible and store it in an easily accessible spot. Another option is to create two kits – a bigger one for sheltering-in-place and a smaller grab-and-go version. Whatever you choose, just make sure your support network knows where they’re kept.

You may also need to include:

  • A two-week supply of prescription medications. If that’s not possible, ensure a copy of the prescription, with the recommended dosage and prescribing doctor, is included
  • A whistle or personal alarm to call for help
  • Written instructions for special medical or mobility equipment in case members of your support network aren’t immediately available
  • Extra eye glasses, hearing aids and hearing aid batteries
  • Spare footwear with any special orthotics

Other considerations:

  • Secure bookcases, TVs and heavy furniture due to the risk of earthquake. This will prevent injury and ensure evacuation routes from a house or apartment are kept clear
  • Ensure mobility devices will always be parked in easily accessible places for quick evacuations.

Pet Preparedness

During an emergency you and your pets may be on your own for several days. Your pets will be relying on you to help them through this time. Preparing for them is as important as preparing for the human members of your family.

Read up on pet preparedness to keep your best friends safe and comfortable when disaster strikes. 

RapidNotify

Would you like to be notified if Kitimat has a community emergency or other serious issue that affects the public?

Sign up to RapidNotify

RapidNotify is a mass communication system that will quickly alert you to any serious safety issues in the community. You can choose to receive messages by phone, text or email.

We test the system twice a year; once in the first half of the year and once at the time of BC's annual Shake Out earthquake drill. 

Additional emergency preparedness information is available at:

Emergency Management BC

Contact Us